Small-Business Owners Deserve a Vacation


Less than half of small-business owners said they would take a summer vacation lasting at least one week in 2013. Many self-employed individuals are reluctant to take time off because they worry about disappointing clients, missing opportunities, or losing income while they are away.1

Unfortunately, working too hard and waiting too long between vacations may not be good for your health or the future of your business. One long-term cardiovascular study reported a link between frequent vacations and longer, healthier lives, and another found that men who skipped vacations for several years were 30% more likely to have heart attacks than those who took at least one week off from work each year.2

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A little bit of rest and relaxation could help you reduce stress, refresh, and become a more productive leader upon your return, and it also may allow your employees to grow. Moreover, a company that runs efficiently in your absence might be more valuable if or when you decide to sell.

Give Yourself a Break
Some advance preparation could make it easier to fit a personal vacation into your business plans.

  • Schedule trips carefully. Your business may have predictable slow or busy periods, so choose a timeframe when your presence may be less critical. Plan ahead so you can work around these dates when setting up important meetings or events.
  • Decide how to delegate. Train one or more key employees to cover specific responsibilities while you are away. Have each person take over those tasks about a week before you leave. This process may help you anticipate potential problems and provide guidance for how they might be handled.
  • Manage client expectations. Tell important clients that you will be away and reassure them that their projects and needs will not be neglected. Give them names of people to contact if they should need assistance. Set up an automatic email response that includes the same information.

Few business owners are able to avoid communication with the office completely. To get the respite you need and deserve — and keep from disappointing family or friends — you may want to schedule a short window of time to check emails and make business-related calls.

1) USA Today, October 28, 2013
2) Psychology Today, May 30, 2013

The information in this article is not intended to be tax or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. You are encouraged to seek tax or legal advice from an independent professional advisor. The content is derived from sources believed to be accurate. Neither the information presented nor any opinion expressed constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. This material was written and prepared by Emerald. © 2015 Emerald Connect, LLC


Lamont Financial Services
250 Bel Marin Keys Blvd, Suite F3 Novato, CA 94949
Phone: (415)883-5200
www.lamontfinancial.com jlamont@lamontfinancialservices.com

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